Angelica

ANGELICA (Angelica archangelica)
(Archangel, Masterwort)Cultivation – Rich, moist soil in sun or partial shade

Propagation – Seed sown in Spring or Autumn. Seed viable for only
one year and it will normally take two years before the plant will go
to seed

Harvest – Roots in Autumn. Leaves are gathered before flowering.
Seeds as they ripen. Stalks are cut in early Summer

Dimensions – 1-2.5 metres high. 1.2 metres wide

USES

Medicinal

Internal – Digestive problems, gastric ulcers, anorexia, morning
sickness, poor circulation, chronic fatigue, menstrual and
obsteric problems

External – Rheumatic pain, neuralgia and pleurisy

**This plant may cause skin allergens. Do not give to pregnant women
or people suffering diabetes (Angelica has a high sugar content)

Culinary – Use like celery (leaves). Stalks can be candied or used
in jams. Flower buds can be used in salads either cooked or raw

Magical – Exorcism, protection, healing, visions

FOLKLORE AND HISTORY

This plant was apparently named after the monk who discovered its
medicinal properties. He claimed he received a vision from an angel
who told him Angelica could cure the plague. The root of this plant
was carried by some American Indian tribes and used as a gambling
talisman. Angelica can protect your property by sprinkling the herb
in the corners of the rooms of your house or around the perimetre.
Smoking the plant may cause visions. Angelica was once used to curb
lust in young men. The root was powered and mixed in cold water for
this remedy.

Sources:

The Complete New Herbal by Richard Mabey (ISBN 0140126821) Published
by Penguin

Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham (ISBN
0875421229) Published by Llewellyn Publications

The Royal Horticultural Society New Encyclopedia of Herbs and Their
Uses by Deni Bown (ISBN 0751333867) Published by DK

The Essential Herb Garden (Growing and Using Herbs in Australia) by
Gilian Painter (ISBN 1864290455) Published by Millennium Books

Disclaimer: This is for reference guide only. Herbs can be used
effectively for mild ailments but medical advice should be consulted
first to rule out major illnesses.

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About mrszoomby

When I'm not writing, I'm training for the zombie apocalypse.
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